NOT REAL NEWS: A look at what didn’t happen this week

  • FILE - In this Wednesday, March 31, 2021 file photo, labor leader and civil rights activist Dolores Huerta stands next to first lady Jill Biden as she talks with volunteers at a vaccination site at The Forty Acres, the first headquarters of the United Farm Workers labor union, in Delano, Calif. On Friday, April 2, 2021, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting Biden gave a speech with the Nazi flag in the background. The flag, seen in the background, features a black eagle surrounded by a white circle on a red background. It was created in the 1960s by César Chávez’s brother, Richard Chávez, and his cousin, Manuel Chávez. The union’s website includes a quote from Chávez explaining the flag’s design: “A symbol is an important thing. That is why we chose an Aztec eagle. It gives pride…When people see it they know it means dignity.” (Mandel Ngan/Pool via AP)

  • FILE - In this Thursday, Dec. 10, 2020 file photo, a registered nurse swabs a patient during testing for COVID-19 in Mifflin Square Park in south Philadelphia. On Friday, April 2, 2021, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting COVID-19 tests cause cancer because they are sterilized with ethylene oxide. Ethylene oxide is a gas commonly used to sterilize medical equipment. It is also used in the sterilization of spices and cosmetics. While it is listed by federal agencies as a carcinogen with long-term exposure, experts say the gas is used only in small amounts to sterilize COVID testing kits and would not present cancer hazard. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum)

  • FILE - In this Monday, Oct. 19, 2020 file photo, a voter submits a ballot in an official drop box during early voting in Athens, Ga. On Friday, April 2, 2021, The Associated Press reported on stories circulating online incorrectly asserting “Georgia’s new anti-voting law makes it a jail-time crime to drop off grandma’s absentee ballot in a drop box.” But the election bill known as SB 202, signed into law on March 25, has an exception allowing people to drop off ballots on behalf of their relatives. It also allows a caregiver to deliver a completed ballot on behalf of a disabled person, or a jail employee to deliver a completed ballot on behalf of someone who is in custody. (AP Photo/John Bazemore)

A roundup of some of the most popular but completely untrue stories and visuals of the week.