Worker who sent false missile alert had problems but kept job

  • Hawaii Adjutant General Maj. Gen. Joe Logan speaks during a news conference about the state’s mistaken missile alert, Tuesday, Jan. 30, 2018, in Honolulu. Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi has resigned and a state employee who sent an alert falsely warning of an incoming ballistic missile has been fired, officials said Tuesday, weeks after the mistake caused widespread panic. (AP Photo/Caleb Jones)

  • Then-Hawaii Emergency Management Agency Administrator Vern Miyagi listens Jan. 19 during a hearing with state lawmakers in Honolulu about the mistaken missile alert in Honolulu.

    Associated Press file photo

  • Associated Press

    Gov. David Ige speaks Tuesday in Honolulu during a news conference about the state’s mistaken missile alert report.

HONOLULU — Hawaii emergency management officials knew for years that an employee had problems performing his job. Then, he sent a false alert warning of an imminent missile attack earlier this month.