Expedition hauls tons of plastic out of remote Hawaii atolls

  • In this April 5, 2021 photo provided by Matthew Chauvin, a juvenile Hawaiian monk seal rests on top of a pile of ghost nets on the windward shores of Laysan Island in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. A crew has returned from the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands with a boatload of marine plastic and abandoned fishing nets that threaten to entangle endangered Hawaiian monk seals and other marine animals on the tiny, uninhabited beaches stretching for more than 1,300 miles north of Honolulu. (Matthew Chauvin, Papahānaumokuākea Marine Debris Project via AP — NOAA/NMFS Permit No. 22677)

  • In this April 8, 2021 photo provided by Matthew Chauvin, workers with the Papahanaumokuakea Marine Debris Project load fishing nets onto a small boat on Midway Atoll in the Northwestern Hawaiian Islands. A crew has returned from the remote Northwestern Hawaiian Islands with a boatload of marine plastic and abandoned fishing nets that threaten to entangle endangered Hawaiian monk seals and other marine animals on the tiny, uninhabited beaches stretching for more than 1,300 miles north of Honolulu. (Matthew Chauvin, Papahanaumokuakea Marine Debris Project via AP)

HONOLULU — A crew returned from the northernmost islands in the Hawaiian archipelago this week with a boatload of marine plastic and abandoned fishing nets that threaten to entangle endangered Hawaiian monk seals and other animals on the uninhabited beaches stretching more than 1,300 miles north of Honolulu.