‘Musical Nostalgia’ to return Saturday

  • DENNIS OSHIRO

The Hawaii Japanese Center’s 17th annual Musical Nostalgia concert is slated for 2-4:30 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 14, at Aunty Sally’s Luau Hale in Hilo.

Widely recognized as one of the center’s most popular events, this year’s concert will again feature some of the Big Island’s most talented singers and choral groups performing a variety of Japanese, American and Hawaiian numbers.

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Marion Arakaki, a renowned karaoke teacher from Honolulu, was originally billed as this year’s special guest artist, but had to bow out of the event. In her place, organizers are pleased to announce Dennis Oshiro stepped up to fill the bill.

Oshiro honed his musical talent under teachers Harry Urata and Richard Aoyagi on Oahu. He later joined Aoyagi’s band and also performed with the Ray Tanaka Orchestra and Dr. T’s Big Band.

Oshiro’s career took a dramatic turn when he traveled to Japan.

His sponsor in Japan was Kyosen Ohashi, a popular writer, producer and TV host who featured Oshiro as vocalist for his band The Sarabrezu (Thoroughbreds). As a member of Ohashi’s band, Oshiro regularly performed on NTV and TBS Radio.

Today, Oshiro dedicates himself to teaching others the joys of music through his Oshiro Music Studio.

Musical Nostalgia chairperson Hiroshi Suga also notes that this year the Hawaii Japanese Center also will present special recognition awards to Hui O Wahine FCE and Tsukikage Odorikai — two groups that have contributed heavily to the center’s success.

Tickets for Musical Nostalgia are $15 in advance, $20 at the door and can be purchased at the Puainako and downtown KTA Super Stores locations, Hilo Daijingu, Kamana Senior Center and Asami’s Kitchen in Hilo.

Aunty Sally’s Luau Hale is located at 799 Piilani St.

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For information, email the Hawaii Japanese Center at ehiura@icloud.com.

Proceeds from ticket sales benefit the center, a nonprofit organization. The Hawaii Japanese Center’s mission is to preserve and perpetuate the history and legacy of Hawaii’s immigrant forbears.

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