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‘The 2018 Kilauea Eruption: One Photographer’s Perspective and Experience’

  • Courtesy photo Channelized pahoehoe breeches the ocean just north of MacKenzie State Recreation Area. Remnants of Puna’s coastal “Red Road” are locked in time within a small kipuka.

  • Courtesy photo Hawaii Fire Department personnel patrol Nohea Street on the northern (Kahukai Street) side of Leilani Estates, with fissure 8 in the background.

Madame Pele’s most recent period of high activity affected people around Hawaii Island, in many cases with devastating effects on lives and well-being.

While we do not lose sight of these effects, and we do what we can to help our ohana, the fact remains — and perhaps it’s a bit uncomfortable to recognize — that the 2018 eruption of Kilauea in lower Puna produced some of the most visually beautiful images of our planet in a transition, destructive and creative.

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One of Hawaii’s leading photographer/videographers put together a breathtaking presentation — a mix of photos and videos — highlighting the eruption from Day 1.

Andrew Hara shares his personal experiences throughout the eruptive events; how his visual media were able to help families, communities and government agencies; and the once-in-a-lifetime opportunity to record 27,000 detailed photographs of a significant geological event in the island’s history.

The Lyman Museum invites everyone to experience the eruption through Hara’s lenses on two occasions next week as part of its Saigo Series programs. The first is 7-8:30 p.m. Monday (Nov. 12). The second is slated for 3-4:30 p.m. Tuesday (Nov. 13).

Admission is free for museum members and $3 for nonmembers.

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Seating is limited; first come, first seated. Additional parking is available at Hilo Union School on Monday evenings only.

The Lyman Museum is located at 276 Haili St. in Hilo. For more information, call 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.