Shortage of taro expected after rains swamp farms on Kauai

  • This April 2018 photo provided by Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama shows a nene, or Hawaiian goose, next to a sign encouraging the community to hold strong after recent flooding in Hanalei, Kauai island, Hawaii. Farmers on Kauai say their state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop after record-breaking rains flooded their fields in April 2018. The deluge hit the Kauai north shore community of Hanalei particularly hard. The region grows most of Hawaii’s taro, a starchy root vegetable which is a staple of the traditional Hawaiian diet and a central part of Hawaiian culture. (AP Photo/Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama)

  • This May 29, 2016 photo provided by Christian Kahahawai shows Lyndsey Haraguchi-Nakayama planting huli, or taro seedlings at her farm in Hanalei, Kauai island, Hawaii. Farmers on the Hawaiian island of Kauai say their state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop, a staple of the traditional Hawaiian diet, after record-breaking rains flooded their fields in April 2018. Haraguchi-Nakayama said damage from the flooding was the worst her family has seen, including her 96-year-old grandfather. It did more harm to their 55-acre farm than Hurricane Iniki that slammed Kauai in 1992. (Christian Kahahawai/Kahahawai Photography via AP)

HONOLULU — Farmers on Kauai say the state should brace for a shortage of its taro crop after record-breaking rains flooded their fields.