Ige says state securing assets, making plans in case lava cuts off lower Puna

  • U.S. Geological Survey photo

    Lava from Kilauea volcano fissure 20 enters the ocean Sunday morning in lower Puna between Pohoiki and Kalapana. The active ocean entry produced a white “laze,” or lava haze, plume. Laze is a noxious gas containing steam, hydrochloric acid and small particles of volcanic glass.

  • U.S. Geological Survey photo Lava from Kilauea volcano fissure 20 enters the ocean Sunday morning in lower Puna between Pohoiki and Kalapana.
  • Facebook photo by Tom Williams

    A midday ash plume from Halema’uma’u crater is seen Sunday from Volcano Golf Course.

  • Associated Press

    Members of the media observe a wall of lava Sunday in lower Puna.

  • Lava erupts Saturday near a home inside Leilani Estates. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)
  • In this May 19, 2018 photo, a river of pahoehoe lava flows inside Leilani Estates near Pahoa, Hawaii. As lava flows have grown more vigorous in recent days, there’s concern more homes may burn and more evacuations may be ordered. (Jamm Aquino/Honolulu Star-Advertiser via AP)

  • Brittany Kimball watches as lava erupts from a fissure near Pahoa, Hawaii, Saturday, May 19, 2018. Two fissures that opened up in a rural Hawaii community have merged to produce faster and more fluid lava. Scientists say the characteristics of lava oozing from fissures in the ground has changed significantly as new magma mixes with decades-old stored lava. (AP Photo/Jae C. Hong)

  • Associated Press

    Steam rises as lava flows into the ocean Sunday in lower Puna. Lava from the ongoing Kilauea volcano eruption in that part of the Big Island crossed Highway 137 and entered the ocean Saturday night.

Gov. David Ige returned to the Big Island on Sunday for an update about the emergency situation in lower Puna after lava from Kilauea volcano crossed Highway 137 and entered the ocean Saturday night.