Historic Vegas neon signs shine bright for 1st time in years

  • In this Jan. 24, 2018, photo, projectors light up non-working neon signs at an exhibit at the Neon Museum in Las Vegas. Starting this week, visitors will be able to see many of the city’s classic neon signs just like they were decades ago through a type of augmented reality that projects realistic animations onto the non-working signs. (AP Photo/John Locher)

  • In this Jan. 23, 2018, photo, John Humphries works on an exhibit at the Neon Museum in Las Vegas. Starting this week, visitors will be able to see many of the city’s classic neon signs just like they were decades ago through a type of augmented reality that projects realistic animations onto the non-working signs. (AP Photo/John Locher)

  • In this Jan. 24, 2018, photo, digital artist and designer Craig Winslow works on an exhibit at the Neon Museum in Las Vegas. Starting this week, visitors will be able to see many of the city’s classic neon signs just like they were decades ago through a type of augmented reality that projects realistic animations onto the non-working signs. (AP Photo/John Locher)

LAS VEGAS — As Frank Sinatra asks Lady Luck to stick around, the neon red lights of one of Las Vegas’ most famous towering signs appear to dance under the night sky, revealing a beating heart and the rest of the marquee of a famed casino-hotel. Other rusted, dusted and broken neon signs in a large gravel lot ringed by a security wall appear to light up with neon not seen for decades as other classic tunes play in the background.