Fashion sense in the Kalakaua Dynasty: Big Island designer to discuss garments created for Iolani Palace project

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Mere decades separated the simple yet beautiful traditional Native Hawaiian clothing from the Victorian-Edwardian style of Europe — a style embraced by Hawaiian royalty and visible in photographs from that period.

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Mere decades separated the simple yet beautiful traditional Native Hawaiian clothing from the Victorian-Edwardian style of Europe — a style embraced by Hawaiian royalty and visible in photographs from that period.

In a unique two-phase project, Iolani Palace commissioned Big Island artist and designer Irisgil Viacrusis to create reproductions of gowns and uniforms worn by the ali‘i during the Kalakaua era. Phase One of the project features Queen Kapi‘olani’s lei hulu manu and peacock gowns and Queen Lili‘uokalani’s coronation and ribbon gowns.

Iolani Palace undertook this project to enhance the visitor experience and highlight the fashion focus of the Kalakaua monarchy, and the public is invited to a presentation by Viacrusis for much more than a glimpse on either of two occasions, from 7-8:30 p.m. Monday (Oct. 16) and 3-4:30 p.m. Tuesday (Oct. 17) at the Lyman Museum.

During his talk, Viacrusis combines PowerPoint images and live modeling of garments to share their individual histories and reconstruction from pieces preserved in the Bishop Museum.

The program is part of Lyman’s Saigo Public Program lecture series. Admission is free to museum members, $3 for nonmembers.

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The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawaii. The museum is open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 276 Haili St.

For more information, call 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

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Fashion sense in the Kalakaua Dynasty: Big Island designer to discuss garments created for Iolani Palace project

  • Queen Kapi‘olani’s lei hulu manu gown is on display in the Throne Room of Iolani Palace.

    Photo courtesy of ELYSE BUTLER, Friends of Iolani Palace

Mere decades separated the simple yet beautiful traditional Native Hawaiian clothing from the Victorian-Edwardian style of Europe — a style embraced by Hawaiian royalty and visible in photographs from that period.

In a unique two-phase project, Iolani Palace commissioned Big Island artist and designer Irisgil Viacrusis to create reproductions of gowns and uniforms worn by the ali‘i during the Kalakaua era. Phase One of the project features Queen Kapi‘olani’s lei hulu manu and peacock gowns and Queen Lili‘uokalani’s coronation and ribbon gowns.

ADVERTISING


Iolani Palace undertook this project to enhance the visitor experience and highlight the fashion focus of the Kalakaua monarchy, and the public is invited to a presentation by Viacrusis for much more than a glimpse on either of two occasions, from 7-8:30 p.m. Monday (Oct. 16) and 3-4:30 p.m. Tuesday (Oct. 17) at the Lyman Museum.

During his talk, Viacrusis combines PowerPoint images and live modeling of garments to share their individual histories and reconstruction from pieces preserved in the Bishop Museum.

The program is part of Lyman’s Saigo Public Program lecture series. Admission is free to museum members, $3 for nonmembers.

ADVERTISING


The nationally accredited and Smithsonian-affiliated Lyman Museum showcases the natural and cultural history of Hawaii. The museum is open 10 a.m.-4:30 p.m. Monday through Saturday at 276 Haili St.

For more information, call 935-5021 or visit www.lymanmuseum.org.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*

By participating in online discussions you acknowledge that you have agreed to the Star-Advertiser's TERMS OF SERVICE. An insightful discussion of ideas and viewpoints is encouraged, but comments must be civil and in good taste, with no personal attacks. If your comments are inappropriate, you may be banned from posting. To report comments that you believe do not follow our guidelines, email hawaiiwarriorworld@staradvertiser.com.